“Knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about epilepsy and their predictors among university students in Jordan” by Jameel Khaleel Hijazeen et al.

"Knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about epilepsy and their predictors among university students in Jordan" by Jameel Khaleel Hijazeen et al.

• Article title: “Knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about epilepsy and their predictors among university students in Jordan”.

– Jameel Khaleel Hijazeen, MD*; Munir Ahmad Abu-Helalah, MPH, PhD; Hussam Ahmad Alshraideh, MS, PhD; Omar Salameh Alrawashdeh, MS, PhD; Fady Nather Hawa, Tareq Dalbah, MD; Fadi W. Farah, MD.
• Journal title: Epilepsy & Behavior, Imapct Factor 2.061, PubMed-Indexed.
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Thanks to Prof. Mona Mohamed and Prof. Amal Abdelrazeq for their feedback about the study questionnaire and all the research assistants who helps us in data collection (Of note, Ahmad Al-Zu’bi). All respect for all.

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• Study was started in ~October 2012 and final version published online today (5-NOV-2014).
• Full bibliographic details: Epilepsy & Behavior (2014), pp. 238-243
• DOI information: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2014.10.010
*Correspoinding author at: P.O. Box: 61245, Smakieh, Karak, Jordan.

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Abstract

The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the knowledge about epilepsy and the attitudes toward people with epilepsy (PWE) and their predictors among university students in Jordan. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed in three of the largest public universities in Jordan, and a total of 500 questionnaires were collected from each university. The number of students who reported that they had heard or read about epilepsy was 1165 (77.6%), and their data were analyzed. A significant proportion of students thought that epilepsy could be caused by the evil spirit (31.5%) and the evil eye (28.1%) or that it could be a punishment from God (25.9%). Epilepsy’s most commonly reported treatment methods were the Holy Quran (71.4%), medications (71.3%), and herbs (29.3%). The most common negative attitudes toward PWE were that the students would refuse to marry someone with epilepsy (50.5%) and that children with epilepsy must join schools for persons with disabilities (44.4%). Male students, students of humanities, and students with a low socioeconomic status tended to have more negative attitudes toward PWE. In conclusion, many students have misconceptions about the causes, treatment, and nature of epilepsy, and students have moderate negative attitudes toward PWE. Universities should have health promotion programs to increase awareness of their students about major public health problems such as epilepsy.

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